What Is Anaphora Example?

What is an example of chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order.

The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus..

What is an example of Antimetabole?

Antimetabole is a figure of speech in which a phrase is repeated, but with the order of words reversed. John F. Kennedy’s words, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country,” is a famous example of antimetabole.

What’s the opposite of Polysyndeton?

Polysyndeton has an opposite, called asyndeton (something Joe is very fond of using). Asyndeton is what would result if you replaced all the conjunctions in the sample sentence above with commas, as in the famous Julius Caesar quote, “Veni, vidi, vici.”

Why is Anastrophe used?

Anastrophe is more common in poetry than in prose. Poets often use it to maintain the rhythm or rhyme scheme of a poem.

What is a Hortative sentence?

Hortative Sentence: The definition of hortative is a choice of words that encourage action. An example would be: “Just try it at least once!”

Is repetition and anaphora the same?

Anaphora is repetition of words at the beginning of clauses, while repetition can occur anywhere, and is a more general term that includes anaphora. … Anaphora is the repetition of a certain word or phrase at the beginning of successive lines of writing or speech.

How do you use the word anaphora in a sentence?

Anaphora in a Sentence 🔉The poem was a great example of anaphora as it started each line with the same three words. … In order to vary sentence variety, my teacher told me to stop using an anaphora at the start of each paragraph. … The classroom contract had an anaphora at the beginning of each new rule.More items…

What is an example of alliteration?

“She sells seashells by the sea-shore.” Another fan-favorite is: “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.”

What is an anaphora in English?

An anaphora is a rhetorical device in which a word or expression is repeated at the beginning of a number of sentences, clauses, or phrases.

How do you write an anaphora?

In order to use anaphora: Think of what you want to emphasize. Repeat that phrase at the beginning of each sentence.

What is Epiplexis?

In rhetoric, epiplexis is an interrogative figure of speech in which questions are asked in order to rebuke or reproach rather than to elicit answers. Adjective: epiplectic. Also known as epitimesis and percontatio.

What is cataphora and anaphora?

In a narrower sense, anaphora is the use of an expression that depends specifically upon an antecedent expression and thus is contrasted with cataphora, which is the use of an expression that depends upon a postcedent expression.

What is an Anastrophe in literature?

Anastrophe is a type of syntax inversion that changes the order of a sentence’s structure for effect. It is often used synonymously with hyperbaton, but can also specifically refer to a specific type of inversion (adjective after the noun).

What is an example of Anastrophe?

Anastrophe (from the Greek: ἀναστροφή, anastrophē, “a turning back or about”) is a figure of speech in which the normal word order of the subject, the verb, and the object is changed. For example, subject–verb–object (“I like potatoes”) might be changed to object–subject–verb (“potatoes I like”).

What is a Polysyndeton example?

Polysyndeton is a stylistic device in which several coordinating conjunctions are used in succession in order to achieve an artistic effect. … For example, in the sentence, “We have ships and men and money and stores,” the coordinating conjunction “and” is used in quick succession to join words occurring together.

What does Epistrophe mean?

: repetition of a word or expression at the end of successive phrases, clauses, sentences, or verses especially for rhetorical or poetic effect (such as Lincoln’s “of the people, by the people, for the people”) — compare anaphora.